Commercial Architecture in the Adelaide Hills.

Commercial buildings’ forms depend upon the area of the site and the amount of working space required. If the client needs a large floor area but the site is small, then a multi-storey solution may be called for. A larger site may accommodate a single-storey building. In the Adelaide suburbs and Adelaide Hills, council development plans usually demand car-parking adequate for customers and employees be provided, and this may take up a lot of space. In multi-storey commercial buildings, carparking can be located in the building undercroft. Boundary setbacks – how many metres building walls may be from a site boundary – are set out in the Building Code of Australia, and council development plans. It’s permissible to build up to a side or rear boundary as long as the walls are of fire-proof construction, otherwise they may have to be up to 3 metres away.

Commercial Buildings Design in Adelaide Hills has strictly laid out functions, and it is the job of the designer to meet all the requirements and make sure that the office that is getting constructed meets the basic needs of the business and also stands by the customary conditions about commercial buildings. It becomes difficult to pull off the modern facilities that are required, look for the comfort of the staff, work within the definite budget and deadline, and keep all the trends included. The job of a commercial building designer is pretty tough.

Commercial Buildings in the Adelaide Hills usually have to fulfill three major categories:

The Function

Fit for purpose: the Adelaide Hills commercial building has to be right for its function. It must be accessible: it must be visible from the street and easily accessed off the street by the cars of customers and staff, and any trucks which are going to service it. The front of the building should have room for signage – on high, visible above the traffic and lower down too, so that it’s readable from closer in. The carpark should be designed so that it’s easy to use, preferably with entry and exit separated, and wide cross-overs. The front entrance should be visible and easily accessed from the carpark. It’s a requirement that parking for disabled is closest to the entrance. Steps into the building should be avoided. A single-storey commercial building is the cheapest per square metre of floor area, but often the site is too small for all functions to be at ground level. A mezzanine floor is one option, or a full multi-storey layout may be called for. If so, one or more lifts would be necessary. All staff and clients must be able to reach the upper floors without having to climb stairs. Escalators are an alternative option for access between floors; they are expensive and take up a lot of space, but are better than lifts for being able to move a lot of people. If your commercial building is to house an industrial process or is for bulk storage, then you might need a large area of column-free floor space and plenty of head room; these needs are achievable using steel portal frames.

Form

The most basic element of a commercial building is its floor. In South Australia, floors are usually concrete. In the Adelaide Hills sites are often sloping; this usually means that there’s some need to cut-and-fill the site to create a bench for the building. Retaining walls may be necessary to stabilise ground which has been cut, and the volume of fill, and concrete piers to support the walls or floors above unconsolidated fill. The building’s walls may be masonry – brick or concrete, or metal – corrugated ‘Colorbond’ steel sheeting or aluminium panel. The Building Code of Australia demand that walls on or close to site boundaries must be fire-resistant, so masonry may be necessary. Metal walls are OK if not closer than 3 metres to a boundary. For the same reason, windows are not permitted closer than 3 metres to a boundary. Windows are usually required for natural lighting and ventilation and display of merchandise; large expanses of glazing must comply with the Glazing Code, which sets out glass thicknesses. In the Adelaide Hills, the climate – cold in winter and hot in summer – means that buildings have to be detailed to conserve energy. This means that insulation is necessary for walls and roofs, and double-glazing may be necessary for windows. Windows’ orientations – north, south, etc,- factor into the energy rules. In some areas of the Adelaide Hills, bushfire resistant building is mandated; external walling and roofing may have to be ‘non-combustible’ and glazing may have to be ‘toughened’.

Construction

The costs of building commercial buildings in the Adelaide Hills are usually comparable with those in Adelaide generally, but may be affected by site works – cut and fill and retaining walls – , on-site wastewater treatment, energy conservation rules, and in some areas, bushfire-resistant construction. The Hills generally have local resources, of materials and skills, comparable with Adelaide generally, for most medium-scale commercial projects.

There are not many companies that can stand up to it. Hence, it is important that in choosing the company, one is quite careful. The company that you are going for must have an industry record of rendering quality work that was appreciated by the client. It is essential that as a consumer, you are well informed and have the knowledge of the authority that you are trusting with the Commercial Buildings Design in Adelaide Hills.

There are a few things that must be included in the office space, and these features ideally make up the perfect office space:

Meeting room

This is essential. An office must have a meeting room, whether it is small or big. Depending on the number of people, the size of the meeting room can be determined. Meeting rooms are the place where the officials meet the outside delegates; receive clients as well as have employees meeting. Hence, it can be said that it is a pretty essential part of the office structure.

Light & Sound

Many organizational psychiatrists have emphasized the setting and background in which the employees work. Due to lack of space, there is not much penetration of natural light and sound, which is essential for having a pleasant environment in the office. So, a Commercial Buildings Design in Adelaide Hills must be having the required light and sound so that the employees feel close to nature. It is essential that architecture has a holistic appeal to the sense. Mere erecting a concrete structure is not something that can be associated with real values of architecture.

Coffee Room

The hectic work schedule makes the caffeine dose quite compulsory for the employees, and it is preferable if they have the corner of their own where they have some coffee during the off time. Though there is no specific type and size to these rooms, it is preferable if the sitting area is good enough to accommodate at least 50% of the employees at one time.

Cubicles

When we talk about Commercial Buildings Design in Adelaide Hills, cubicles are a must as no office is complete without having the cubicles. Cubicles are the best ways to make the most of the space that is available to us. If you start to give cabin to each of the employees, then it may be a problem, but with cubicles, large areas are effectively converted into sitting areas.

Reception-cum-Lobby

Have a neat and simple reception area that can also be used as lobby as and when required. When clients come to visit and the hours are busy, you can make them sit there for sometime before you attend to them.

When we talk about Commercial Buildings Design in Adelaide Hills or any other Building design in Adelaide, it is essential the basic requirements are kept in mind along with the feasibility and budget.

If you are confused about what exactly to get for your commercial space in particular, then get in touch with Adelaide Architect. They have accomplished many tasks, and you can check all the details on the website they have.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply